Thank You!

(B.A.S.E. teachers Joe Younts, Kim Waber, and Chris Dubach)

We are so thankful to have received a grant from the Heart of Indiana United Way’s Economic Relief Initiative Funds for the B.A.S.E program in Randolph County!

The grant received will be used to purchase rewards/incentives for BASE students who demonstrate good behavior, for personal hygiene items, sensory items to stimulate the five senses, clothing, shoes, or other needed articles of clothing, as well as food items. This year we have implemented a new behavioral incentive program for BASE students. Each school-day BASE students can earn one ticket every 30 minutes for good behavior. Tickets are given throughout the day for positive behavior and can be removed for negative behaviors. At the end of each day, students can trade in their tickets for the purchase of items or they can choose to save them for bigger items that have a higher ticket value. BASE students and staff met this week to determine specific tangible and intangible rewards along with appropriate ticket values for each.

In October we are planning to start doing some hands-on cooking/food preparation with BASE students to create and eat various food items. This also is a great opportunity to teach students how to make a list of needed food items, compare prices of the food items at the store, learn to safely prepare and serve food items, and properly clean dishes. In addition, teaching youth to make food items themselves will help them have a general knowledge of ways to save money preparing food items themselves versus frequently eating out. We really appreciate your support and faith in our program.

Thanks again for your generous grant contribution so we can better assist Randolph Youth in our BASE Program,

Chris Dubach, Home-based Program Coordinator

Healthy Families would like to introduce our new Family Support Specialist, Ashlyn Maloy.

I am a 22-year-old who graduated from IUPUI, May of 2021. I received a Bachelor of General Studies with a concentration in Social and Behavioral Science, as well as a minor in psychology and a minor in sociology. Prior to attending IUPUI, I graduated from Union City Jr./Sr. High School in 2017. My husband and I just returned to the area last year. We will celebrate our first wedding anniversary this Halloween.

This summer, we welcomed our first baby into our family. Before we had our son, Beau, we already had three other babies; two cats and a dog. When I’m not at work, you’ll most likely find me spending time with my family, listening to crime podcasts, cooking, doing some kind of craft, or playing Animal Crossing. Even though we’ve only had about three months with our son, I feel he has taught me a lot of valuable information that I can use in my role as a Family Support Specialist.

As an FSS, I hope to continuously grow and expand my knowledge to be as helpful as possible for each family. I’m excited to be a part of the Youth Service Bureau and find a fulfilling career working with Healthy Families!

B.A.S.E.

Behavioral, Academic and Social Education


I have seen firsthand the positive impact that meaningful, supportive, adult relationships can have on youth. I was able to connect with all of the BASE youth over the summer in person to provide support and talk about events of their summer. What we did: eating lunch, going out for ice cream, playing basketball, playing Frisbee golf, and even catching some crayfish/tadpoles in a creek in Winchester.

I have found that students will often discuss things they are dealing with if they do an activity they enjoy. It also helps if you show them that you care, and have developed trust and accountability. Two of the BASE youth were able to maintain jobs over the summer. BASE youth talked about their current support systems and activities that they were going to engage in and were able to stay out of trouble with law enforcement. Students have returned to school. BASE students had to re-adjust to classroom rules and expectations for behavior.


So far behaviors have been a challenge for most students to not give in to negative peer pressure from others or seek negative attention from peers. However, BASE students are starting to realize that they are missing out on incentives for good behaviors and also receiving negative consequences for their actions. BASE staff has also really been focusing on students taking ownership/responsibility for each individual choice instead of blaming others. Within the next month, we are planning to start cooking some food items as incentives and also begin teaching some life skills to students.

Although we haven’t yet been able to do this yet, this is something that they/we are looking forward to. Today was a really good day behaviorally for all students. Students completed a full-day amount of online school assignments in the morning. They were allowed to watch a movie this afternoon and also received a drink of their choice at McDonald’s. We are always glad to reward students for good behavior!

Congratulations to Linda Ashman, Tina Bechtol, and Stacy Blankenbaker

Congratulations to Linda Ashman, Tina Bechtol, and Stacy Blankenbaker. They all recently reached the 23-year mark at the YSB!

Other recent impressive anniversaries!

  • Christy Nel – 16 years
  • Scott Bissell – 16 years
  • Chris Dubach – 14 years
  • Jamie Maloy – 13 years
  • Cindy Bainter – 8 years
  • Alison Strausbaugh – 8 years
  • Karley Theurer – 8 years
  • Daniel Peterson – 8 years
  • Jonetta Stevens – 7 years
  • Michlynn Gaddis – 7 years
  • Katie Helm – 6 years
  • Kim Baer – 4 years
  • Shelby Miller – 4 years
  • Erika Limbert – 2 years
  • Shelli Rigsbee – 1 year


Thank you all for your hard work and dedication!!!

Thank you all for your hard work and dedication!!!

The Youth Service Bureau of Jay County, Inc. (YSB) would like To Give Special Thanks!

Left To Right.

Carlin Tipton, Todd Weaver Jr., Chris Liby, Clint Skirvin, Carl Masters, Todd Weaver Sr., Thomas Hampton. Not Pictured: Ryan Wilson

The Youth Service Bureau of Jay County, Inc. (YSB) would like to send a special thanks out to Mark Lefever and the KBL Transport team for their recent generosity!

Property at 609 West Arch Street was recently purchased by the YSB. Thanks to their help and generosity we are one step closer to having a nice green space for supervised visitations, outpatient play therapy, and YSB employee functions.

Kimberlost

 

 

A couple of falls ago, I took a walk at Rainbow Bend park near the covered bridge in Ceylon, part of the Limberlost  swamp. It was a beautiful Sunday afternoon and I was having a grand time enjoying the beauty of my surroundings. I decided to get off of the marked path of the swamp and explore. There were some interesting things to see.  I wasn’t worried about getting lost but I was wrong. When I turned to head back, I became disoriented. I didn’t know which way to go. I was Kimberlost (my full name is Kimberly).

My phone had died earlier on the hike and I could feel panic set in.  It was crazy, here I was in the middle of the day; knowing I wasn’t far from home but I didn’t know how to get there. I envisioned myself being there at night and needing a rescue squad.  I prayed and tried my phone again. Miraculously it powered up! I called my husband fully expecting to get his voicemail, because he rarely has his phone with him, but by another miracle he answered.

All of his boy scout training paid off, he said “Kim follow the flow of the river and that will get you back. I will drive over there to make sure you make it.” I have to admit there were some moments I doubted his wisdom as I headed back, at times the way just didn’t feel right.  I didn’t want to trust but I had no other good options, I complied.  He was right. Soon, I was back on the recognized path. A blue heron appeared and flew down the path in front of me. He seemed to be saying, “Follow me, I will lead you home.” As I rounded the end of the trail my prince in a white Ford truck pulled up to make sure I made it. I was safely home.

This experience spoke to me about being lost.  It had been a long time since I had been lost. It was frightening to be so close to home but not know how to get there. I needed the support of Mike to get me home. Mike who was just a phone call away.  We at YSB Outpatient Therapy Services are this:  a phone call away.  A phone call to offer the support to get you back on the right path, when life has gotten you lost and you don’t know which way to go.  We provide services to youth, families, and adults who are struggling with depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, communication, and relationship concerns. And if we can’t provide the services you need we will provide resources to head you in a hopeful direction.

260.726.8520

260.726.8520

Kim (berly) Baer MHS, MSW, LCSW

YSB Outpatient Therapy

YSB Outpatient Therapy

This experience spoke to me about being lost.  It had been a long time since I had been lost. It was frightening to be so close to home but not know how to get there. I needed the support of Mike to get me home. Mike was just a phone call away.  We at YSB Outpatient Therapy Services are this:  a phone call away.  A phone call to offer the support to get you back on the right path, when life has gotten you lost and you don’t know which way to go.  We provide services to youth, families, and adults who are struggling with depression, anxiety, grief, trauma, communication, and relationship concerns. And if we can’t provide the services you need we will provide resources to head you in a hopeful direction.

260.726.8520

YSB Outpatient Therapy

Home-Based Family Services

What Are Home-Based Family Services?

Unlike the outpatient or residential programs, home-based services seek to work with families in the primary place of need – their own home! Whether working to preserve intact families or train and support them as they seek reunification, home-based workers are equipped to help families reach their greatest potential in a variety of ways.

What Types Of Services Fall Under Home-Based?

Family Preservation Services (FPS) were introduced in 2020 as part of a state-wide initiative to reduce the number of child removals and provide more support to parents in order to keep children safe. Family Preservation provides comprehensive services including the use of evidence-based parenting
models, providing concrete support for families, and intensive safety checking and planning.


Supervised Visitation provides a safe environment for children who have been removed from their home to maintain or improve a healthy relationship with their parent(s). Supervised visits may occur in the home, in public, or in an office setting according to family needs. Home-based workers provide guidance and support for parents to improve their parenting skills and promote healthy bonding with their children.


Home-based Casework and Homemaker/Parent Aid meet a variety of family needs including household management, employment, housing, parent education, mentoring, connecting with resources, transportation assistance, and a variety of other needs. Caseworkers and Homemaker/Parent Aids provide a broad assessment leading to strengths-based, goal-oriented treatment planning.


Home-based Therapy seeks to bring inner healing to children and families. Therapy may address issues such as trauma, substance use/abuse, mental health, and family dynamics. Home-based therapy is provided by Master’s-level clinicians and may occur in the home, public, or office setting.

Where Does YSB Provide Home-Based Services?

Home-based services are offered to families involved with DCS or juvenile probation. YSB Home-based programs are available throughout DCS Region 7 including Adams, Blackford, Delaware, Grant, Jay, Randolph, and Wells Counties along with Henry and Wayne Counties in Region 12. Specific services may be only be available in certain counties due to staffing and caseloads

K. A. R. S. S.

The Keeping At-Risk Students in School program works with youth that are suspended or expelled from school, or who
need extra support and guidance that are at-risk. These students participate in community service at locations around
Jay County, at places like the Jay County Humane Society, Jay County Retirement Center, Arts Place, United Way, Jay
County Antique Mall, local churches and libraries. Youth in this program also benefit from tutoring help, behavior
management and drug prevention education.


Since the beginning of the program, the KARSS program has worked with 1,039 youth and have completed over 10,430
hours of community service. The KARSS program is currently working with 18 youth and has been focusing on
completing schoolwork, walking dogs at the humane society, and helping with the bi-weekly food harvest food drive

Safe place

Safe Place is a national program that assists youth in crisis. Safe Place is a national youth outreach and prevention
program for youth under 18 years old. It is a national program, with 32 counties in Indiana participating. In Jay County,
there are currently 16 sites! These sites include: The Youth Service Bureau, Jay County Jr-Sr High School, Westlawn
Elementary, Redkey Elementary, East Jay Elementary, JRDS, Portland Fire Department, Portland Police Department,
Portland Pizza King, Jay County Retirement Center, Jay County Sheriff Department, Pennville Library, Dunkirk City
Building, Dunkirk Police Department, Bearcreek Trustees office, and Bryant Volunteer Fire Department. These sites are
trained to be able to help youth, that may come in needing help!


When youth finds themselves in a crisis, homeless, or with nowhere safe to go, they can rest assured that Safe Place
can give them the help they need. When a youth enters a Safe Place site, the training employees take them to a private,
safe area and then will get an idea about what is going. From there, they will call the Youth Service Bureau to inform
them that they have youth in need, and the staff at the Youth Service Bureau will tell them what staff will be coming to
the site to help the youth. Once the Safe Place Coordinator gets the site, she will get more information about what is
going on at home, and will help get the youth resources they need. If the situation is not safe for the youth to return
home, they will be offered a place to stay at the residential home, until things are figured out at home and it is safe to
return home. If the youth decides they want to return home that nights, their parents will be called and brought in, and
resources will be given so that next time the youth feels to be in crisis, they will not feel the need to run away again

Residential Care

“The reason I initially wanted to be a part of YSB is that it aligned with my degree. I thought that YSB would help me get a good start on my career once I finished college. I knew that I would be caring for children, and that is where my heart is. The third shift does not allow me to interact with the residents often, but I do feel like the residents are a part of my life and I’m keeping them safe. I do believe in this program, and it has helped me to realize that I do not want my own classroom once I graduate. My goal is to work with children who need guidance and counseling in dealing with personal or family issues.

As far as the program goes, I think that the kids have an abundance of opportunities while being given a safe place to live. The residents can engage in extracurricular school activities and join the workforce, depending on their age. The recreation calendar is full of daily activities to keep the residents occupied and giving them the opportunity to try new things. The residents have taken trips, and they are always doing outdoor activities during the warm months. I know that there is so much more to the program. These are just a few things that I believe would spark interest because a lot of people that I have spoken with portray YSB differently. Not really in a negative way, but they see it more as a jail rather than a program providing stability and support to kids and families.

There are also plenty of free resources and training opportunities for staff. Our boss is pretty cool too.” ~Amy Wicker, Direct Care Worker, Residential